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Road damage by overweight trucks

October 20, 2013

To the editor: The Brown County Board would like to remind everyone who drives a truck on Brown County roads of the damage that overweight trucks cause and why these roads are restricted,......

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(22)

Wychter

Nov-09-13 10:43 PM

Back to the point of the article...overweight vehicles. There are weight restriction laws that cover all the roads in Brown Co. and do not exempt farmers. Shouldn't you be debating why the sheriff and highway patrol aren't enforcing these laws??

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Twizzy

Nov-04-13 10:46 AM

Also . . is it true that a farm owned semi does not need to be operated by someone holding a CDL????

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deerhunt

Oct-25-13 11:48 AM

Twizzy , good idea, that could be in the form of a permit and it could be used for the repairs of the road. That would be a very fair way of doing it.

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Twizzy

Oct-25-13 10:27 AM

Coming full circle every link should pay their fare share of taxes when using a publically owned road. Why should the semi delivering the finished product pay taxes when the grain cart hauling to the elevator doesn't?

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WXMolds

Oct-25-13 9:47 AM

@deerhunt You continuously imply that I am a farmer. Yet, I was born and raised in the city and have never lived on a farm. So nice assumptions. You are comparing apples to oranges with transport, equipment, etc.. The only way for humans to live is off food. So you take away the lower part of the chain, the so called farmer and everything collapses. If you manufacture farm equipment, the farmer is what provides your job. So you have no relevance stating that one job in the world is greater than another. Everything is supported just like the "food chain". Take one link out and the system fails.

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Twizzy

Oct-25-13 9:41 AM

I couldn't just agree with deerhunt's last comment, I had to do this and agree with every single word of it. How would this food get to the store to be sold without the 1000's of people working minimum wage in between? I will say 100% of my food does not come from the farm, unless you call my garden and my animals my farm, then I guess so. The comment of "You want to eat?" is losing steam. What percentage of the corn in Minnesota alone goes to ethanol plants, overseas, etc.? Have some respect for your fellow Americans. We all have to live here, and a little respect and cooperation goes a long ways.

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deerhunt

Oct-25-13 6:43 AM

So you are saying the farmer's point of view is ,we shouldn't be inconvenienced in taking the header off the combine ,even though it would make things safer for all. For your information ,if a semi was going down the road with a load that wide , they would be required to have a police escort front and back. As far as me being a selfish taxpayer , us taxpayers are also the ones that build equipment, transport , process and sell your food. You are not the only ones in the food chain , merely the starting point . There are a lot of people that work hard to put the food that ends up on your table as well. They work a lot of hours ,rotating shifts , for low wages. Then those same people also pay for 60% of your crop insurance and give you a subsidy after that . Yea, just call me selfish. Sorry , I have to go get ready for my second job, so I can pay some more taxes and to put food on my table.

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WXMolds

Oct-25-13 5:12 AM

Of course you can't see around "30' wide,12 row corn heads" if your riding the back of a combine. Allow yourself a proper distance to see around said combine. It's not like they are drag racing down the road so that it will impinge on your ability to get around them. If they are driving lawfully, they have every right to that same roadwat that you are on.A combine can't impede oncoming traffic, therefore you have every opportunity to legally pass in the on coming lane. What do you do when a "wide semi load" or "long semi load" is driving down the road? I guarantee you that they are driving a lot faster and physically can no longer trim the width of there load. Yet, they have every right to that same roadway because material needs to get to places. Finally, it makes you sound selfish bringing up being a taxpayer. Because where does "your" food come from? In the end "100%" of your food no matter what process eventually comes from the far

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deerhunt

Oct-24-13 3:09 PM

" no reason why a farmer should convenience the general public", that makes you sound ungrateful for the taxpayer picking up 60% of your crop insurance and also paying you a subsidy at the end of the year even though you had already made a profit. When the law was written , I doubt there was bean heads 30' wide,12 row corn heads, that you can't see around. The law should be revisited, turn signals would be nice also so that you can tell when they are going to turn into a field approach.

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WXMolds

Oct-24-13 2:57 PM

Why the change the law? There is absolutely no reason why a farmer (if using flashers and every other lawful act of safety) should "convenience" the general public on the road. If you want safety, then take the extra time by slowing down and safely pass farm equipment.

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mnsotn

Oct-24-13 2:20 PM

That law should be changed, WX.

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WXMolds

Oct-24-13 10:55 AM

@deerhunt - Yes, it would be safer for the general public if they did remove. However, according to state law they don't have to remover a header. This is stated under the "Implements of Husbandry". As long as they abide by the rules (such as having flashers and staying to the right of the center) they have every legal right. It is up to the drivers of other vehicles to recognize that there is something bigger than them on the same road and proceed with caution when approaching and passing.

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middleclassworker

Oct-24-13 12:54 AM

I agree with Deehunt. There is absolutely no reason why they can't remove the head and haul that to the field separately. Of course, it may be inconvenient, but every other business out there deals with inconveniences.

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deerhunt

Oct-23-13 12:09 PM

WXMolds, you know how many times I see the combines going down the road with the header still on , truckers must have the load broken down to the narrowest with possible. Yes , it may require some extra work to take the header off and pull it behind on a cart , but wouldn't that be safer for everyone?

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WXMolds

Oct-23-13 11:58 AM

@metoo2 - How do you propose that farm equipment that exceeds 8 feet in width access fields when the only way is to use a public road? Farmers and there equipment have every right to the road as a car or even a bicyclist. If a public road is the only viable option for travel, then what else are they to do?

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metoo2

Oct-23-13 10:10 AM

There is a maximum legal limit of eight (8) feet in width for vehicles using public roads. That limit should be adhered to by ALL vehicles on the road.

If a semi has lights burnt out that semi can be ticketed, lights should be required and visible at all sides of ALL vehicles on the road.

Semi drivers are required to carry a class A drivers license, at this time farmers don’t need that IF they are hauling their own crops. All tractor trailer drivers should have the same requirement.

All vehicles using public roads need to pay taxes; at this time farm equipment using public roads are exempt from taxes.

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mnsotn

Oct-23-13 7:45 AM

Much of the damage is not immediately visible. I doubt the good farmers are paying for that.

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deerhunt

Oct-23-13 6:44 AM

Rellab, Farmers have 60% of their crop insurance paid for by tax payers, and then they receive a subsidy . So basically you are saying we are paying for all your crop insurance. Nice! As far as the overweight trucks , your saying the farmers that are running overweight are making a donation to the roads they damage? The farmers at work here laugh about how they run overloaded , especially weekends because they know they don't get caught. The equipment they run gets larger every year , thus causing more damage. Why do you think the timing of this announcement from the county came out now? They were trying to be nice , they didn't want to come out and say "hey you farmers". As far as the government payments , they are hardly small payments, I've been on the website. Try running a business in town ,there is nobody their to back you up , the way it should be in a free market . FYI, I farmed .

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Rellab

Oct-22-13 8:37 PM

@mnsotn A good farmer will pay to have a road fixed if he's the one who wrecked it

@deerhunt Subsidies don't amount to much. Subsidies basically pay for crop insurance. I'd like to see you work a job that has many unforeseeable and uncontrollable risks. Stop acting like they are giving every farmer millions of dollars because that isn't the case. Maybe a little education would go a long way for you.

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Twizzy

Oct-22-13 10:17 AM

mnsotn nailed it right on the head. Especially in the spring . . . farm equipment, farm semi's in the fall . . . all very hard on the road. Sadly, deerhunt also nailed it on the head.

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deerhunt

Oct-21-13 3:30 PM

That probably would not work , they would come up with a program to refund the money to them (subsidy). Just cost us more in the long run.

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mnsotn

Oct-21-13 1:16 PM

You can start by taxing farm vehicles that use the taxpayer funded roads. Every other business, including nonprofits like churches and charity groups have to.

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